Courses

SPRING 2017 COURSES IN UKRAINIAN STUDIES

UKRAINE IN NEW YORK

History

GU4253

Points: 4

Wednesdays, 12-2PM

Instructor: Alexander Motyl

Ukraine in New York is a multidisciplinary exploration of the Ukrainian-American community in New York City from its beginning in the late 19th century to the present.  The course focuses on the history, demographics, economics, politics, religion, education, and culture of the community, devoting particular attention to the impact thereon of the New York setting, shifting attitudes towards American politics and culture and homeland politics and culture, the tensions encountered in navigating between American, Soviet Ukraine, and independent Ukraine...

Alexander Motyl can be reached at: ajm5@columbia.edu

 

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THE AURA OF SOVIET UKRAINIAN MODERNISM

Slavic

GU4037

Points: 3

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:10-2:25PM

Instructor: Mark Andryczyk

This course studies the renaissance in Ukrainian culture of the 1920s - a period of revolution, experimentation, vibrant expression and polemics. Focusing on the most important developments in literature, as well as on the intellectual debates they inspired, the course will also examine the major achievements in Ukrainian theater, visual art and film as integral components of the cultural spirit that defined the era. Additionally, the course also looks at the subsequent implementation of the socialist realism and its impact on Ukrainian culture and on the cultural leaders of the renaissance. The course treats one of the most important periods of Ukrainian culture and examines it lasting impact on today's Ukraine. This period produced several world-renowned cultural figures, whose connections with the 1920s Ukraine have only recently begun to be discussed. The course will be complemented by film screenings, presentations of visual art and rare publications from this period. Entirely in English with a parallel reading list for those who read Ukrainian.

Mark Andryczyk can be reached at ma2634@columbia.edu

 

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UKRAINE; POWER, POLITICS AND DIPLOMACY

Regional Institute

U8755

Points: 3

Tuesdays, 2:10-4PM

Instructor: Valerii Kuchynskyi

Ukraine is at war, the country is in turmoil. What is to be done by the Government to rebuff foreign aggression, eradicate corruption, improve economic situation and implement reforms?  What are the chances of the new opposition to succeed? Will the Minsk accords be implemented?

These and other issues, including behind-the-scene politics, power struggle and diplomatic activities, are dealt with in the newly revised course delivered by a career diplomat. The course is aimed at both graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

Ambassador Kuchynskyi can be reached at: vk2187@columbia.edu

 

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BORDERS IN MOTION: THE EUROPEAN UNION AND UKRAINE

Instructor: John Biersack

Course Info: TBA

This course examines aspects of Ukraine’s shared border with the European Union as a prism for understanding contemporary transformations in boundaries, security, migration, and identity. We will cover bordering processes from different perspectives and scales in order to analyze the impacts of material and imagined boundaries in Ukraine, Europe, and beyond. Course materials are interdisciplinary and draw from a variety of bodies of thought such as: political geography, political science, anthropology, critical security studies, migration studies, border studies, and history.

John Biersack can be reached at biersack@ku.edu

 

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POST COLONIAL/POST SOVIET CINEMA

Comparative Literature/Slavic

W4075

Points: 3

Tuesdays, 6:10pm-10:00pm

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

The course will discuss how filmmaking has been used as a vehicle of power and control in the Soviet Union and in post-Soviet space since 1991. A body of selected films by Soviet and post-Soviet directors that exemplify the function of film making as a tool of appropriation of the colonized, their cultural and political subordination by the Soviet center will be examined in terms of post-colonial theories. The course will also focus on the often over looked work of Ukrainian, Georgian, Belarusian, Armenian, etc. national film schools and how they participated in the communist project of fostering a as well as resisted it by generating, in hidden and, since 1991, overt and increasingly assertive ways, their own counter-narratives.

 

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ELEMENTARY UKRAINIAN II

Slavic

UN1102

Points: 4

Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8:40-9:55AM

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

 

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INTERMEDIATE UKRAINIAN II

Slavic

UNI1202

Points: 4

Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 10:10-11:25AM

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

 

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ADVANCED UKRAINIAN II

Slavic

GU4002

Points: 3

Mondays and Wednesdays, 1:10-2:25PM

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

The course is for students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian. Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participles, gerunds, declension of numerals, and a more in-depth study of difficult subjects, such as verbal aspect and verbs of motion. The material is drawn from classical and contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media, and film. Taught almost exclusively in Ukrainian.

Dr. Shevchuk can be reached at: sy2165@columbia.edu

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Courses at Columbia are open to students from other universities in the New York metropolitan area seeking credit.  Please contact the university at which you enrolled to determine whether it participates in this manner with Columbia University.  Some courses are also open to outside individuals interested in non-credit continuing studies. Additionally, through the Lifelong Learners program, individuals over 65 years of age who are interested in auditing courses, may enroll at a discount rate as Lifelong Learners. Please visit the Columbia University School of Continuing Education (http://www.ce.columbia.edu/auditing/?PID=28) for more details.

January 17th is the first day of classes and January 27th is the final day to register for a class. For more information about courses or the Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia University, please contact Dr. Mark Andryczyk at ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu or (212) 854-4697.