Why the Ukraine Crisis Endures

Wednesday, April 18, 2018
6:00pm
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room (1219 International Affairs Building, 420 W 118th St)

Please join the Harriman Institute and the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs for a talk with Elise Giuliano, Lecturer in the Political Science Department at Columbia University and Director of Graduate Studies of the MA program at The Harriman Institute.

The war in east Ukraine seems to have turned into another frozen conflict in post-Soviet Eurasia. While the Minsk II agreement has more or less functioned to reduce violence on the ground in the east, neither Russia nor Ukraine has made progress toward implementing the terms of the agreement. Why? This talk will address the causes of the Ukraine crisis and the reasons for its persistence by examining the interests and motives of both Ukraine and Russia. The talk will also discuss domestic politics in Ukraine, in particular the ways in which Poroshenko’s government has disappointed the population’s hopes following the Maidan revolution. Giuliano will present research on popular opinion in Ukraine based on field research she conducted in east Ukraine. Finally, she will address what these developments mean for U.S. and European support for Ukraine going forward.

Elise Giuliano is a Lecturer in the Political Science Department at Columbia University and Director of Graduate Studies of the MA program at The Harriman Institute. Her award-winning book, Constructing Grievance: Ethnic Nationalism in Russia’s Republics (Cornell University Press, 2011), examines why some mass populations in Russia’s ethnic republics supported nationalist separatism while others remained quiescent during the transition from Soviet rule. Currently, Giuliano is researching how the crisis in Ukraine has influenced political opinion among Ukrainian citizens—especially in the understudied eastern regions of the country. Her recently published article “Who supported separatism in Donbas? Ethnicity and popular opinion at the start of the Ukraine Crisis” appears in a special issue on identity in Ukraine in Post-Soviet Affairs.