Courses

Spring 2019 Courses in Ukrainian Studies

Click here to download a PDF version of the course list.

 

BRAND NEW: CREATING IDENTITY IN CONTEMPORARY UKRAINIAN CULTURE

GU4054

Slavic

Points: 3

Tuesday and Thursdays, 1:10-2:25PM

Instructor: Mark Andryczyk

This course presents and examines post-Soviet Ukrainian literature.  Students will learn about the significant achievements, names, events, scandals and polemics in contemporary Ukrainian literature and will see how they have contributed to Ukraine’s post-Soviet identity.  Students will examine how Ukrainian literature became an important site for experimentation with language, for providing feminist perspectives, for engaging previously-banned taboos and for deconstructing Soviet and Ukrainian national myths.  Among the writers to be focused on in the course are Serhiy Zhadan, Yuri Andrukhovych, Oksana Zabuzhko and Taras Prokhasko. Centered on the most important successes in literature, the course will also explore key developments in music and visual art of this period. Special focus will be given to how the 2013/2014 Euromaidan revolution and war are treated in today’s literature. By also studying Ukrainian literature with regards to its relationship with Ukraine’s changing political life, students will obtain a good understanding of the dynamics of today’s Ukraine and the development of Ukrainians as a nation in the 21st century. The course will be complemented by audio and video presentations. Entirely in English with a parallel reading list for those who read Ukrainian.

Mark Andryczyk can be reached at ma2634@columbia.edu

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INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF UKRAINE

UN1037

History

Points: 4

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4:10-5:25PM

Instructor: Johannes Remy

The goal of this course is to gain a general understanding of the history of Ukraine, with the ability to identify its disputed and controversial topics. Students will discuss different interpretations of medieval Rus, and then survey the history of the region from the end of the sixteenth century to present, paying attention to politics, economy, social structure, ideas, ethnic groups and nationalities, and gender. The topics to be discussed include the Church Union of Brest, the Cossack Wars, the autonomous Hetmanate under Russian suzerainty, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, the Habsburg Empire, the Russian Empire, World War I, revolution and the short-lived Ukrainian states 1917-21, Ukrainians in the interwar Poland and the Soviet Union, the Holodomor or the Great Famine 1932-33, World War II and the Holocaust in Ukraine, destalinization in Ukraine, independent Ukraine and its political upheavals, including the recent Russian attack on Ukraine.

 Johannes Remy can be reached at jr3929@columbia.edu

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UKRAINE IN THE RUSSIAN AND HABSBURG EMPIRES

GR8053

History

Points: 4

Mondays, 4:10-6PM

Instructor: Johannes Remy

In 1764, Russia abolished the traditional Cossack autonomy of the Hetmanate on the Left Bank of Dnipro river. In the partitions of Poland-Lithuania 1772-1795, Russia and Austria took the territories where Ukrainians/Ruthenians lived. In 1783, Russia annexed the Crimean Khanate. Thus began the imperial period of Ukrainian history which lasted to the collapse of both empires in World War I. In this seminar, we will read in depth about and discuss the two empires and their regional policies, noble landowners, peasants, workers, the Ukrainian national movement, revolutionary movements, Jews, Crimea, women, and religious life. 

Johannes Remy can be reached at jr3929@columbia.edu

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TODAY’S UKRAINE: POWER POLITICS AND DIPLOMACY

U8755

SIPA

3 points

Tuesdays, 2:10-4PM

Instructor: Valerii Kuchynskyi

Ukraine is at war and the country is in turmoil. What is to be done by the Government to rebuff foreign aggression, eradicate corruption, improve the economic situation and implement reforms?  What are the chances of the new opposition to succeed? Will the Minsk accords be implemented?  What will be the impact of the March 2019 presidential elections? These and other issues, including behind-the-scene politics, power struggle and diplomatic activities, are dealt with in the newly revised course delivered by a career diplomat. The course is aimed at both graduate and advanced undergraduate students.

Valerii Kuchynskyi can be reached at vk2187@columbia.edu

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ELEMENTARY UKRAINIAN II

UN1102

Slavic

Points: 4

Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays,11:40am-12:55am

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

Designed for students with little or no knowledge of Ukrainian. Basic grammar structures are introduced and reinforced, with equal emphasis on developing oral and written communication skills. Specific attention to acquisition of high-frequency vocabulary and its optimal use in real-life settings.

Yuri Shevchuk can be reached at sy2165@columbia.edu

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INTERMEDIATE UKRAINIAN II

UN2102

Slavic

Points: 4

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, 10:10am-11:25am

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

Prerequisites: UKRN W1102 or the equivalent. Reviews and reinforces the fundamentals of grammar and a core vocabulary from daily life. Principal emphasis is placed on further development of communicative skills (oral and written). Verbal aspect and verbs of motion receive special attention.

Yuri Shevchuk can be reached at sy2165@columbia.edu

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ADVANCED UKRAINIAN II

UN4002

Slavic

Points: 3

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:10pm-4pm

Instructor: Yuri Shevchuk

Prerequisites: UKRN W2102 or the equivalent. The course is for students who wish to develop their mastery of Ukrainian. Further study of grammar includes patterns of word formation, participles, gerunds, declension of numerals, and a more in-depth study of difficult subjects, such as verbal aspect and verbs of motion. The material is drawn from classical and contemporary Ukrainian literature, press, electronic media, and film. Taught almost exclusively in Ukrainian.

Yuri Shevchuk can be reached at sy2165@columbia.edu

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Courses at Columbia are open to students from other universities in the New York metropolitan area seeking credit.  Please contact the university at which you enrolled to determine whether it participates in this manner with Columbia University.  Some courses are also open to outside individuals interested in non-credit continuing studies. Additionally, through the Lifelong Learners program, individuals over 65 years of age who are interested in auditing courses, may enroll at a discount rate as Lifelong Learners. Please visit the Columbia University School of Continuing Education (http://www.ce.columbia.edu/auditing/?PID=28) for more details.

January 22nd is the first day of classes and February 1st is the final day to register for a class.

For more information about courses or the Ukrainian Studies Program at Columbia University, please contact:

Dr. Mark Andryczyk
ukrainianstudies@columbia.edu
(212) 854-4697