Roy Bar Sadeh
Department of History
Roy Bar Sadeh is a Ph.D. candidate in History and an affiliate of the Institute for Comparative Literature & Society at Columbia University. His dissertation is an intellectual and socio-political history of the concept of minority and its role in connecting Islamic modernists throughout South and West Asia. Roy examines how Islamic modernists across the British, Ottoman Tsarist and, after 1917, Soviet Empires confronted, and redefined their categorization as “minority” by modern empires and emerging nation-states. Drawing on Arabic, Urdu, Russian, Persian, and  Hebrew sources, he explores how these Muslim intellectuals engaged with ongoing global debates about minority status and political emancipation.
His broader research interests include Islamic thought and law, relations between Islamic reform and daily practices in the Indian subcontinent, the Mashriq and the Russian Empire/Soviet Union, comparative nationalisms and empires, as well as interdisciplinary approaches to intellectual history.
Roy’s research has been funded by the Social Science Research Council International Dissertation Research Fellowship, the American Institute of Indian Studies Junior Fellowship, Jerrold Siegel Fellowship in Intellectual and Cultural History, Harriman Institute Junior, Pepsico, and Padma Desai Fellowships, Columbia University International Travel Fellowship, and the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life Dissertation Fellowship.
 
Selected Publications:
“Towards a Global Intellectual History of Minority,” (co-authored with Lotte Houwink ten Cate).” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 41, no. 3. (forthcoming) “Between Cairo and the Volga-Urals: al-Manar and Islamic Modernism, 1905-1917.” Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 3 (2020): 525-553 “Debating Gandhi in al-Manar during the 1920s and 1930s.” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 38, no. 3 (2018): 491-507
Roy Bar Sadeh is a Ph.D. candidate in History and an affiliate of the Institute for Comparative Literature & Society at Columbia University. His dissertation is an intellectual and socio-political history of the concept of minority and its role in connecting Islamic modernists throughout South and West Asia. Roy examines how Islamic modernists across the British, Ottoman Tsarist and, after 1917, Soviet Empires confronted, and redefined their categorization as “minority” by modern empires and emerging nation-states. Drawing on Arabic, Urdu, Russian, Persian, and  Hebrew sources, he explores how these Muslim intellectuals engaged with ongoing global debates about minority status and political emancipation.
His broader research interests include Islamic thought and law, relations between Islamic reform and daily practices in the Indian subcontinent, the Mashriq and the Russian Empire/Soviet Union, comparative nationalisms and empires, as well as interdisciplinary approaches to intellectual history.
Roy’s research has been funded by the Social Science Research Council International Dissertation Research Fellowship, the American Institute of Indian Studies Junior Fellowship, Jerrold Siegel Fellowship in Intellectual and Cultural History, Harriman Institute Junior, Pepsico, and Padma Desai Fellowships, Columbia University International Travel Fellowship, and the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life Dissertation Fellowship.

 

Selected Publications:

“Towards a Global Intellectual History of Minority,” (co-authored with Lotte Houwink ten Cate).” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 41, no. 3. (forthcoming)

“Between Cairo and the Volga-Urals: al-Manar and Islamic Modernism, 1905-1917.” Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History 3 (2020): 525-553

“Debating Gandhi in al-Manar during the 1920s and 1930s.” Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 38, no. 3 (2018): 491-507

logo