The Harriman Institute at Columbia University is one of the world's leading academic institutions devoted to Russian, Eurasian and East European studies. Our mission is to serve our community at the university and beyond by supporting research, instruction, and dialogue, sponsoring vibrant and multidisciplinary events that bring together our extraordinary resources of faculty, students, and alumni. We are committed to training the next generation of regional specialists to play leadership roles in setting the academic and scholarly agenda, making policy and challenging accepted truths about how we study our rapidly changing world.

Nov
13
Wednesday, November 13, 2019
Yuri Shevchuk, Lecturer in Ukrainian, is quoted in the November 13, 2019, edition of the New York Times on the proper, Ukrainian, pronunciation of Ukraine's capital city, vs. the Russian pronunciation and spelling.
Nov
12
Tuesday, November 12, 2019
The recent conference "New Actors and Strategies for Fighting and Investigating Corruption in the Western Balkans" (Nov. 7-8, 2019) was covered by the international press. Organizer Tanya Domi (SIPA) and HI Director Alexander Cooley were interviewed by Voice of America. The conference was also written up by Klix.ba, the biggest online media platform in Bosnia. And a write-up appeared on Deutsche Welle.
Nov
6
Wednesday, November 6, 2019
Nigina Khaitova (SIPA ’20) was a Harriman Institute’s 2019 Civil Society Fellow. She is President of SIPA Eurasia Group and focuses on human rights, the United Nations, and East Central Europe. Read the spotlight.
Nov
1
Friday, November 1, 2019
Why three letters—and a Beatles song—trigger grammatical controversy, historical trauma, and existential crisis in Kyiv. Mark Andryczyk, Associate Research Scholar in the Ukrainian Studies Program at the Harriman Institute comments for an article in Foreign Policy on the geopolitics of Ukraine’s "The."
Oct
31
Thursday, October 31, 2019
Kimberly Marten, Professor and Chair of the Political Science Department at Barnard College, quoted in the Washington Post.
Oct
22
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 to Wednesday, December 18, 2019
Harriman Institute Atrium, 12th Floor International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)
The Harriman Institute and the Kolodzei Art Foundation present the exhibit Sergei Volokhov: Theory of Reflection. Selections from the Kolodzei Art Foundation. This exhibition features selected paintings and drawings from the 1980s to the present by prominent Russian artist Sergei Volokhov. These imaginative drawings on specially prepared paper are contemplations by the artist on Russian history and his personal memories.
Nov
18
Monday, November 18, 2019
12:00pm
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)
Please join the Program on U.S.-Russia Relations at the Harriman Institute for a book talk with Jennie L. Schulze, associate professor of political science at Duquesne University.
Nov
18
Monday, November 18, 2019
7:30pm
1201 International Affairs Building (420 West 118th St, 12th floor)
Please join the East Central European Center at the Harriman Institute for a 50th-anniversary screening of the classic Czech film Witchhammer (Kladivo na čarodějnice, 1969, directed by Otakar Vávra). Introduction and post-film discussion led by Christopher Harwood, Lecturer in Czech at Columbia University and Co-Director of the East Central European Center. Film run time: 103 minutes.
Nov
19
Tuesday, November 19, 2019
12:00pm
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)
Please join the Ukrainian Studies Program and the East Central European Center at the Harriman Institute for a presentation by Ola Hnatiuk of her book Courage and Fear (Academic Studies Press, 2019).
Nov
21
Thursday, November 21, 2019
6:15pm
Marshall D. Shulman Seminar Room, 1219 International Affairs Building (420 W 118th St)
Please join the East Central European Center at the Harriman Institute for a roundtable discussing Contemporary European History 28, a special issue on post-Versailles human and social sciences in Eastern Europe with historian Eugenia Lean, and the co-editors of the volume, Katherine Lebow, Małgorzata Mazurek, and Joanna Wawrzyniak.